Dec
10
Dec 11

Advocacy: Connecting People and Government through Storytelling

Description: When it comes to influencing policymaking, quality is better than quantity. While social media makes it easier to engage more people, it also makes it more critical to craft the right message to activate participants and influence lawmakers. What is the goal of the campaign—and how do you tell that story? In this workshop, we will discuss the power of story telling and sharing personal experiences as an advocacy strategy. Using case studies from POPVOX.com, a nonpartisan platform, we will explore how individuals, community groups and organizations share real stories with their lawmakers, and not just petition signatures or form letters. The idea is that each of us (as concerned citizens, students, family members or community members) have a story to share about why an issue is important to us, and lawmakers need that information to develop better policies.

Presenter: Rachna Choudhry, Co-founder, POPVOX

Location: Room 204, Ward Circle Building

Dec
10
3:00 pm15:00

Vicious Circle: Children, Gun Violence and Trauma

Description: How are children adversely impacted by direct and indirect exposure to gun violence? Would reducing direct and secondary exposure to gun violence lead to less gun violence in the long term? This workshop looks at gun violence’s direct effect on children living in highly impacted environments. It will also consider how gun violence generates toxic stress and hinders development in all children growing up in an armed and violent society, where they regularly experience school lock downs, are exposed to news headlines about school shootings and other gun violence, and are exposed to violent video games, movies, and ads.

Presenters:
Gloria Pan (Moderator), National Campaign Director, Gun Safety and Rapid Response, MomsRising.org;
Andy Pelosi, Executive Director, Campaign to Keep Guns Off Campus;
Dr. Jeff Hutchinson, Associate Dean of Clinical Affairs and Chief Diversity Officer for the F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine;
Selvi Chellaiah, Mental Health Associate, The Children's Center at John's Hopkins Bayview.

Location: Room 2, Ward Circle Building

 

Dec
10
3:00 pm15:00

Families of homicide victims - The Global Transcedance Model

Description: The Global Transcendence Model was founded in 2010 by Activist and Philanthropist William Patterson as a result of his personnel response to homicides in the DC Metro, with the goal of reducing shootings and homicides in the DC Metro using the Public Health System, methods of Disease Abatement that have been used by Health Organization globally and other organizations to address epidemic problems such as Drug and Alcohol Addiction,  AIDS and other leading causes of death in the world and combining that with Organic Services. The Global Transcendence Model Strategy has nine core activities that work in concert to disrupt the transmission and reduce the prevalence of violence in the community. These activities are to detect and interrupt potential shooting events transmission; identify and change the thinking of persons at highest risk (potential transmitters); and change group and community norms. Additionally, data and monitoring are used to measure and provide constant feedback to the system.

Presenter: William Patterson, CEO of Universal Healthcare Management Services Inc. and Global Transcendence

Location: Room 204, Ward Circle Building

Dec
10
3:00 pm15:00

Community Control of Police & Stopping Intra-Community Violence

Description: The ideas "Black on Black crime" and "Black on Black violence" are meant to spread ideas of Black inferiority, increase divisions within the community, justify hyper-policing and imposing a constant state of martial law. By never hearing in the media of "white on white crime" and never hearing such terms used for any other people besides Black people suggests that Black people are especially unable to behave sensibly as a people and supports state sponsored stereotypes of our youth as "super predators."

Rejecting these ideas is not to deny that Black/African communities do face serious issues of violence and low level criminal activity. Instead it is to choose to address the root causes for our conditions and get to real solutions that can put an end to them. This interactive popular education workshop will show how Community Control Over Police has to be included with other creative solutions to the violence and crime in our community caused by the country's deepening economic and social crisis.

Presenter: Netfa Freeman, Organizer, Pan-African Community Action (PACA)

Location: Room 203, Ward Circle Building

 

 

Dec
10
3:00 pm15:00

Organizing: The Power of the Student Voice

Description: Join leaders from a number of student organizations at the George Washington University, Georgetown, and AU to  discuss the importance and power of the student voice. We will discuss how students can effectively mobilize and advocate for sensible and intersectional gun violence prevention legislation, how students can participate with the larger GVP movement on the national level, and how students can provide a powerful voice to help end gun violence.

Presenters:
Pranav Nanda, President and Founder of Colonials Demand Action (GW)
Ntebo Mokuena, Vice President, Students for Justice in Palestine (AU)
Sarah Clements, Georgetown U.

Location: Room 205, Ward Circle Building

 

Dec
10
12:15 pm12:15

Coping with the Holidays While Grieving

Description: Coping is especially difficult during the holiday season. In this workshop, we will discuss normal grief reactions, aspects of the holiday season that can be triggers for grief, provide opportunities for group discussion and also for making a personalized plan for managing holiday stressors.

Presenter: Sara Moore Kerai, MA, MPH, LPC

Location: Room 204, Ward Circle Building

Dec
10
12:15 pm12:15

Part II: Police Militarization & Military Policing - Activist Strategy Session

Description: How do the U.S. police increasingly look like a military? How does the U.S. military take on a policing role abroad? Through an examination of connections between the “war on drugs” and the “war on terror,” we will explain what “militarization” means for targeted communities in concrete terms. Activist facilitators will cover: the impact of increased police militarization on black and brown communities in the U.S., the connection between racist violence at home and racist violence abroad, and the relationship between U.S. police and the Israeli military as an example of these power dynamics.

The activist strategy session following the political development workshop makes space for us to co-create strategies for challenging, dismantling, and re-envisioning the police-military relationship.

Presenters: 
David Swanson, Director, worldbeyondwar.org
Jamani Montague, Prison Advocacy Coordinator, RootsAction.org
Leah Muskin-Pierret, Activist, MENA Region
Miriam Pemberton, Director, Peace Economy Transitions Project, Institute for Policy Studies

Location: Room 2, Ward Circle Building

Dec
10
12:15 pm12:15

Before and After Pulse: LGBTQ Activism against Violence

Description: LGBTQ activism against violence has spanned history, long before the mass shooting at Pulse Nightclub in Orlando, FL. LGBTQ activism has been largely effective and successful, and continues to occupy an impressive position in grassroots movements. Seasoned queer activists will share their experiences with LGBTQ activism and offer both lived and learned experience in combatting gun violence in an intersectional manner. 

Presenters:
Michael Adolph, Co-Founder, Gays Against Guns DC
Stephania Mahdi, Chair, DC Anti-Violence Project, DC Center for the LGBT Community
Firas Nasr (Moderator), Founding Organizer, WERK for Peace

Location: Room 203, Ward Circle Building

Dec
10
12:15 pm12:15

Part II: Faith-based gun violence prevention organizing

Description: Throughout American history, the faith community has taken a, if not the, leading role in national social movement building to impact change and live in a more just society.  It's time for us to do so again, to make homes, schools, congregations and communities safer from gun violence.  Learn how to powerfully engage people and communities of faith to organize and take action to prevent gun violence.

Presenters:
Bryan Miller, Executive Director, Heeding God’s Call to End Gun Violence
Rebecca Cole, Grassroots Organizing Program Coordinator, General Board of Church and Society of the United Methodist Church

Location: Room 205, Ward Circle Building

Dec
10
11:15 am11:15

Part I: Police Militarization & Military Policing - Political Education

Description: How do the U.S. police increasingly look like a military? How does the U.S. military take on a policing role abroad? Through an examination of connections between the “war on drugs” and the “war on terror,” we will explain what “militarization” means for targeted communities in concrete terms. Activist facilitators will cover: the impact of increased police militarization on black and brown communities in the U.S., the connection between racist violence at home and racist violence abroad, and the relationship between U.S. police and the Israeli military as an example of these power dynamics.

The activist strategy session following the political development workshop makes space for us to co-create strategies for challenging, dismantling, and re-envisioning the police-military relationship.

Presenters: 
David Swanson, Director, worldbeyondwar.org
Jamani Montague, Prison Advocacy Coordinator, RootsAction.org
Leah Muskin-Pierret, Activist, MENA Region
Miriam Pemberton, Director, Peace Economy Transitions Project, Institute for Policy Studies

Location: Room #203, Ward Circle Building

 

Dec
10
11:15 am11:15

Everything has gone terribly wrong - now what?: Combatting gun-enabled domestic violence at the state level.

Description: As we dig in and prepare to protect existing federal firearms laws, the future of proposed federal legislation to protect victims and survivors of intimate partner violence from abusers with firearms looks bleak.  However, opportunities abound at the state level.  In this workshop, panelists will discuss the importance of state laws, identify areas of improvement, and share experiences building coalitions to pass legislation to keep guns out of the hands of abusers.

Panelists: 
Kate Ranta, Domestic and Gun Violence Survivor, Activist
Rachel Graber, Public Policy Manager, National Coalition Against Domestic Violence
Penny Okamoto, Executive Director, Ceasefire Oregon Education Foundation
Lindsay Nichols, Senior Attorney, The Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence/Americans for Responsible Solutions Foundation

Location: Ward Circle Building, Room 2

Dec
10
11:15 am11:15

Part I: Faith-based gun violence prevention organizing

Description: Throughout American history, the faith community has taken a, if not the, leading role in national social movement building to impact change and live in a more just society.  It's time for us to do so again, to make homes, schools, congregations and communities safer from gun violence.  Learn how to powerfully engage people and communities of faith to organize and take action to prevent gun violence.

Presenters:
Bryan Miller, Executive Director, Heeding God’s Call to End Gun Violence
Rebecca Cole, Grassroots Organizing Program Coordinator, General Board of Church and Society of the United Methodist Church

Location: Room 205, Ward Circle Building